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Mauritius-Textanalyse

Frage: Mauritius-Textanalyse
(6 Antworten)

 
Ich muss für einen englischen Text über Mauritius hinsichtlich der Sprache analysieren und (natürlich) eine kurze inhaltliche Zusammenfassung geben. Bei diesem Text bin ich mir allerdings nicht recht sicher (da es ein Text ist, der eher Werbung für einen Urlaub in Mauritius macht) wie und was ich in die sprachliche Analyse packen soll und wie ich es interpretieren soll.


Source: http://travel.nytimes.com/2005/03/06/travel/06mauritius.html?_r=1&pagewanted=all&position=


Chic Hideaway in the Indian Ocean
By DEBRA A. KLEIN


Correction Appended
A WOMAN wearing crisp white linen and cradling her mocha Longchamps pliage bag as if it were a Shih Tzu raced to be first in the door of the French bakery. In the Mercedes she had just left, a man primped in the rear view mirror, raking his auburn coif. They were downtown chic on a Saturday - in the shadow of an emerald green volcanic spire - even though the nearest metropolis was Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, on the east coast of Africa, 1,500 miles and a world away.
Mauritius, one of the Mascarene Islands, has long been a playground for wealthy European celebrities - Prince William, Princess Caroline, Joseph Fiennes and Ewan McGregor among them. Now this Indian Ocean island is fast attracting $1,000-a-night sun-seekers from North America looking to top off an African safari with a beach vacation.
Mauritius lies in the crossroads between Asia and Africa, with more of a Caribbean Creole vibe than an Arabian Nights feel. The island, nearly identical in size to Maui, evokes the fable of the six blind men encountering different parts of an elephant: visitors can perceive it in at least a half-dozen ways.
By night, broadly smiling performers dance Sega - part African tradition, part J. Lo video - gyrating their toned midriffs to a pulsing beat. By day, sari-wrapped women flood Hindu temples; Kufi-capped Muslim boys dash past colonial buildings in palm-draped villages; and visitors relax at five-star playgrounds, pampered with cooling spray mists by private plunge pools overlooking the ocean.
Mauritius, most famous as the home of the extinct Dodo, is determined tourism will not suffer a similar fate. Decades-old hotels are remodeling, Bollywood has come calling and a handful of megaresorts opened in the last year.
The island`s footprint is undistinguished - an accidental pancake drip shape. It is what surrounds the island that lures tourists: an almost total fringing reef. (Some speculate that this feature kept damage from December`s tsunami minimal.)
The most difficult vacation decision? How much to plunk down where for a week.
On the breezy east coast, two of the island`s oldest properties had first dibs on perfect sand. The One & Only chain`s Le Saint Géran and Le Touessrok, stand in splendid sugary isolation.
Le Touessrok`s was remodeled just over two years ago, and now you can bathe in an egg-shaped tub before lying sunny-side up in an oceanfront chaise. Want a lower profile? Book a suite on the hotel`s exclusive Frangipani Island, reached only by a wooden bridge. Ocean suites in that wing are $975 to $2,130 a person a night, at $1.33 to the euro, depending on season; the junior suites cost $490 to $1,090 a person.
At the more tropical-feeling Saint Géran, you can play Greta Garbo and be alone - except for a butler and cook - in the 6,700-square-foot villa, which starts at $6,475 a night (for the villa, not per person) up to $13,520.
Ready to eat, but not dressed for Alain Ducasse`s Spoon des Iles at Le Saint Géran? Chez Tino, a short drive into the nearby hamlet of Trou d`Eau Douce, is a sort of Mauritian Greek diner, where you can chase Chinese noodles with Creole lobster and a vegetable curry. Or head less than a mile up the road to Le Four à Chaux where a crunchy tomato, onion and lime salad is best followed with an island-style bouillabaisse or seafood platter of the day`s freshest catch.
If scenery is more important than making the scene, stay on the west coast`s powdery beach at Wolmar and Flic en Flac, south of the capital, Port Louis, for a slice of Tahiti, complete with a backdrop of craggy volcanic spires. Wake early to watch nervous-looking horseback riders amble along the shore; linger late enough to see the sky turn an orangey pink. Fill the stretch between by floating face down in the never-ending almost-white lagoon looking for bright blue fish, but watch out for couples pedaling and rowing uncontrollably in all manner of watercraft.
At the southern end of the beach, the new 65-villa Taj Exotica overlooks Tamarin Bay. The landscaping is still sparse, but with a starting nightly rate of $1,046 for the 1,700-square-foot Mauritius-meets-Mumbai villas, you`ll probably spend all the time in your private plunge pool anyway. The resort also offers a free daily meditation session, as well as a four-hour "total dinacarya" treatment ($300): a combination of ayurveda, yoga and a customized vegetarian meal that will leave you stress free.
For new sports-oriented resorts, head south, past the dramatic Morne Mountain - a charismatic Close Encounters outcropping - to the island`s just opened golf enclave at Bel Ombre. Le Telfair Golf and Spa Resort`s rooms are done in cheery Connecticut country club décor. Nine holes are open, with nine more expected by April.
On the opposite side of the island, Grand Baie is billed as a sort of Waikiki meets Cancún. It is a mere comma of a village, with a beach like a kid`s tub with too many toys- all boats and no real place to swim. Discrete (and discreet) hotels are far from the upscale shopping centers along the roadside, behind walls and foliage.
One of the oldest - the Royal Palm -was modernized in recent years, adding a Clarins spa to complement its 84 suites. The hotel has attracted dignitaries, but little overt attention, for decades with three very private presidential suites - including actual presidents (Jacques Chirac and François Mitterrand among them). The Royal Suite has three levels, an office and its own steam room.
Twenty minutes south on the western coastal road, past palms and villages, the four-year old Oberoi feels like a bit of MoMA moved to Africa. The beach is not as wide as some others, but there are dramatic sculptures in the main pool and the thatched-roof villas with private dining (and dipping) areas provide more than enough lazing room. If not, the nearly 7,000-square-foot Royal Villa is almost like a minihotel.
The coast`s best off-resort restaurant is La Cravache d`Or in Trou aux Biches. Its ceiling fans and whitewashed décor scream colonial Jamaica, but the cooking puts Paris on the plate.
The dining room opens straight onto a swatch of sea lighted at night so you can watch gently bobbing boats while deconstructing the shrimp tagine or fresh dorado accented with Creole touches and island fruits. Dinner for two with wine, dessert and appetizer was comfortably under $100.
Grand Baie is also the site of several wallet-relaxing choices in simple, boutique properties, at about $150 a night, with breakfast. The newly remodeled Le Sakoa, on a calm bay popular with French tourists, has just 16 renovated dramatic suites in two-floor villas, with dining room-sized balconies.
Yet even this lower-cost property offers the island`s trademark: a beachfront stand-alone cottage with a bit of cachet - perfect for the typical Mauritius vacationer, who after all believes that a journey of several thousand miles ends with fewer steps to the sand.


Danke im Vorraus, für alle die sich mit dem Thema beschäftigen (werden).
GAST stellte diese Frage am 01.03.2010 - 01:20

 
Antwort von GAST | 01.03.2010 - 13:40
Ich verstehe nicht so ganz: du knallst uns hier einen ellenlangen Text aus der Reisenbeilage der New York Times vor die Füße,
lamentierst etwas rum, so dass wir alle vor Mitleid zerfließen (schnüff), und dann heißt es: Nun macht mal für mich! Ja, hast du denn noch alle? Das ist doch deine Aufgabe. Derjenige, der dir die Aufgabe stellte. vertraute darauf, dass du es kannst.
Das musst du auch uns erst mal zeigen!

ha.lo

 
Antwort von GAST | 01.03.2010 - 21:25
sry, hatte noch was anderes zu tun...
Meine Ergebnisse:

2.1 structure:

•introduction of the topic: excerpt of a daily-life scene
•background information about wealth
•description of inhabitants, religion and culture
•attraction for the tourists
•naming different hotels, resorts and places
•conclusion and arrangement with the trademark of Mauritius,
major revenue source = tourism

2.2 language:

•common words and sentences --> text is easy to read
•colloquial passage
•adjectives --> highlights culture and vacation activities, conflict: luxury | landscape, reader can imagine the island, forcible elements
•background information --> informative, important to deal with the main issues
•listing of vacation activities --> gives summary, recommends offers
•repetitions -->reader remembers, emphasizing
•conclusive text --> affordable dream

Bibliographical references:
http://travel.nytimes.com/2005/03/06/travel/06mauritius.html?_r=1&pagewanted=2
http://www.newsweek.com/id/48131
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mauritius
http://www.mauritius.net/index.php


Muss die Zeilenangaben der Textbeispiele nochmal nachbearbeiten (folgen noch) da die Zeilenangaben hier anders sind als bei mir im Word.

Shurti


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Antwort von algieba (ehem. Mitglied) | 01.03.2010 - 23:42
Ich finde super, was du auflistest, auch deine Struktur (auch wenn ich den Artikel jetzt natürlich nur überflogen habe).
Bist du sicher, dass du hier was interpretieren musst? Die Zielrichtung des Artikels ist doch klar (und das kommt ja in deiner Analyse schon ein wenig raus). Sollte es nicht ausreichend sein, dem nochmal einen Absatz zu widmen, ohne "Interpretation"?

@ha.lo: Shurtugal hat nicht um Erledigung der Aufgabe gebeten, sondern um Tipps für die Herangehensweise an die Textanalyse. Das ist doch legitim (zumal es sich hier nicht um die 500. Charakterisierung zu Emilia Galotti etc. handelt) und muss auch nicht bemeckert werden.

 
Antwort von GAST | 02.03.2010 - 00:17
@algieba: Jop ich muss die Sprache analysieren. I.d.R. nach Stilmittel, sprachlichen Auffälligkeiten (Umgangssprache, Wortfelder etc.) und die Autorintention interpretieren. So jedenfalls bei allen unseren ehemaligen Übungen in der Schule. Das Problem liegt hierbei allerdings wirklich klar auf der Hand: Das ist eine verdammte Reisewerbung :D


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Antwort von algieba (ehem. Mitglied) | 02.03.2010 - 00:26
Naja, dann hat die Autorin die Intention, dem Leser Mauritius schmackhaft zu machen, indem wenig problematisiert und stattdessen viel mehr lebendig und szenisch beschrieben wird. :D

 
Antwort von GAST | 02.03.2010 - 16:05
Ja richtig^^ habs heute genauso dargestellt

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